PhilSPEN Online Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

(Article 64 | POJ_0059.php) Issue

Thesis Abstract

WAIST-HEIGHT RATIO (WHtR) AS A PROBABLE DETERMINANT OF DIABETES AMONG FILIPINO OBESE YOUNG ADULTS IN BATANGAS

Introduction | Methodology | Results | Conclusion | PDF () |Back to Articles Page

Submitted:

AUTHOR: Kristia Lei A. Reyes, RND

INSTITUTION WHERE STUDY WAS DONE: Philippine Women's Univeristy, Metro-Manila, Philippines

KEYWORDS: waist-height ratio, obesity, diabetes, young adults

INTRODUCTION | Back

Background:
An increasing trend was noted on the prevalence of overweight and obesity and diabetes among different age groups in the Philippines (FNRI-DOST, 2013). Anthropometric measurements and indices are used to determine the nutritional status and risk for chronic diseases. The most common obesity indices are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and waist-hip ratio which measure excess body fat or fat distribution. A latest measure of adiposity is waist-height ratio (WHtR). Findings of different countries revealed that waist-height ratio is better in terms of discriminating a person's risk to different obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Recently, a study was done by the FNRI-DOST that determined its usefulness in predicting risk to cardiovascular disease among Filipino adults (Orense, et. al., 2014).

Objectives:
The objectives of this study was to determine if Waist-Height Ratio (WHtR) is a probable determinant of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Filipino obese young adults (19-25 years old) in Batangas and to compare with the other obesity indices.

 

METHODOLOGY | Back

Anthropometric variables such as weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference, Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR), Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-Height Ratio (WHtR) were measured among twenty (20) diabetic obese and twenty (20) non-diabetic obese young adults. Presence of diabetes was identified by measuring their fasting blood sugar level. The Diabetes Risk Assessment Form by the Finnish Diabetes Association was also used to identify the risk level of the respondents.

RESULTS | Back

Results showed that there is no significant difference on the demographic profiles and anthropometric variables between diabetic and non-diabetic respondents. In comparing the association between the anthropometric indices (Waist Circumference, Waist-Hip Ratio, Body Mass Index and Waist-Height Ratio) and Diabetes Risk, this study showed that Waist Circumference exhibited significant association. No significant association was noted between Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR) and Body Mass Index (BMI) with diabetes risk. On the other hand, while the Odds Ratio (OR) value for Waist-Height Ratio (WHtR) and diabetes risk could not be determined, the high WHtR values 2:0.5 (for all categories: slightly elevated risk, moderate risk and high risk) exhibited by afl the respondents, somehow may show potential risk determinant of diabetes given a larger sample size.

CONCLUSION: | Back

 

Introduction | Methodology | Results | Conclusion | Back to Articles Page